ACORN Conference Program

All Workshops

The Role of soil biodiversity in agriculture production

Wednesday, November 28, 10:00 AM - 11:00 AM   

Do you know what’s living in your soil? Soils are home to an extraordinary number of organisms and healthy soils depend on soil biodiversity. This session will give an overview of soil biology and its role in productive and sustainable agriculture. We will discuss the impact of management decisions on soil biodiversity, with a focus on soil food webs and mycorrhizal fungi.

Stream:

Speaker(s):

Mob Grazing for Soil Health

Wednesday, November 28, 1:30 PM - 2:30 PM   

John Duynisveld will be discussing what mob grazing is, and how it can affect animal production, plant growth, and soil fertility.  The talk will include material from published research trials in other parts of the world as well as on-going work at AAFC Nappan and experience using mob-grazing on my own farm.

Stream:

Speaker(s):

Soil Biodiversity, Weed Ecology & High Density Grazing: the Honest Practicalities

Wednesday, November 28, 2:30 PM - 3:30 PM   

Farmer-researcher, John Duynisveld will lead an open discussion sharing individual challenges while guiding questions and responses around promoting soil health and biodiversity. He will share personal experience about intensive grazing and help others examine practical approaches to incorporating livestock into their production systems.

Stream:

Speaker(s):

  • TBA

What we can learn from weeds for the development of ecological weed management

Wednesday, November 28, 11:15 AM - 12:15 PM   

Weeds can tell you a lot about your environment, soil and farming practices. Many of our farming practices create niches for which troublesome agricultural weeds are perfectly adapted. Ecological weed management seeks to minimize weed problems through an understanding of biological and ecological processes taking place in our agroecosystems. The first step to any integrated weed management program is accurate identification. Once identified, an integrated weed management program can be developed which addresses the current weed issues as well as the ecological conditions promoting it. Utilizing “many little hammers”, ecological and integrated weed management programs rely on multiple and diverse tactics such as critical periods, crop rotations and cover crops to manage weeds in the short- and long-term. Through well-organized planning steps, preventative measures, in-season control efforts and continuous adaptation, weeds can be managed in an ecological way that prevents current weed issues from becoming major weed problems.

Stream:

Speaker(s):

Program at a Glance